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, with five days left until the fiscal cliff of tax hikes and spending cuts. the house planned to reconvene on sunday evening. a christmas season storm rolled through the northeast and new england, as the death toll climbed to 16. and lisa jackson announced she's stepping down as administrator of the environmental protection agency. and online, we've got a unique year-in-review of sorts. kwame holman has more. >> holman: science correspondent miles o'brien has had a most interesting 2012. he's crawled in sewage, cuddled with dolphins and played guinea pig to lots of experiments. watch some of the best outtakes of miles' science stories on the rundown. and we round up the most important lessons we've learned about helping kids stay in school from our series, american graduate. all that and more is on our web site newshour.pbs.org. margaret? >> warner: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm margaret warner. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. >> major funding for th
cliff occurs. >> ifill: the across-the-board cuts. why does it work that way? >> in the event no deal is made and we do have the automatic cuts known as sequestration starting in january, federal employees face job loss and in some situations-- certainly in the department of defense-- but throughout the federal government people will be furloughed, forced to take unpaid days off, anywhere from 20 to 50 days. we really don't know. it depends in part on the agency and it depends in part on how much of the remainder of the fiscal year these cuts are squished into. so it's -- that's one bad situation. and then the so-called grand bargains and deals, many of those include provisions that would cut federal retirement benefits and extend the current pay freeze for an additional three years so that federal employees would go five full years without any paid a justments. >> ifill: hugh johnson, if you were an investor or a business owner and you're watching wall street watch the fiscal cliff debate what are you telling them? are people nervous? >> well, even though i think there's been some po
cut their vacations short, to deal with fiscal cliff negotiations. they have five days to make a deal. and housing continues to be the bright spot in the u.s. economy: home prices post their biggest advance in two years. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! christmas may be over, but the holiday shopping season continues. many consumers hit the malls today to return gifts and buy what they really wanted. and this is the time many gift cards get redeemed. but for retailers, holiday sales so far have been a flop. sales in the two months leading up to christmas, rose just 0.7%, according to mastercard advisors that tracks the numbers. that's way below what the retail industry was predicting. erika miller spoke with retail expert dana telsey and began by asking what happened. >> i think there were a confluence of events, extra long season. hurricane sandy. tragedy in ct. >> none of the events out there were feel good factor events. it was all for consumer morale. >> when you look at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merc
is lifted. >> one area you would like thei. that is a fiscal cliff area. >> closed american bond fundsaee leveraged and we think the dividends are going to be cut and there is a risk we would just avoid them. >> do you own any of theserecom? >> for our discretionaryaccounte closed end accounts and the herzfeld caribbean accounts olds all of the those we spoke of. >> susie: thank you very much tom. or our market monitor tomorrow herzfeld. coming up on monday on "n.b.r." we'll be monitoring those fiscal cliff negotiations, and we'll have news and analysis. we'll also a look back at the year in stocks, and s&p's sam stovall joins us to pre-view what's next for the markets in the year ahead. it could be one of the biggest trends in business next year: companies setting aside time for their employees to play. ruben ramirez explains. >> reporter: it may be hard to remember those hot summer days on the playground. the freedom to let your mind wander. how times have changed. as companies slashed jobs during the great recession worker productivity surged, today, many people are doing the job multi
, it looks like lawmakers will celebrate new year's eve at work-- if not resolving the fiscal cliff, at least trying to avoid the blame. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: going over the fiscal cliff will not only have an impact on the national level, it will also hit states and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way
leaders met face to face for the first time in weeks, in a last-ditch effort to avert the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on the chances for a breakthrough-- just four days before automatic tax hikes and spending cuts hit. >> brown: then, we turn to india. ray suarez looks at the violent protests and public anger sparked by the gang rape of a young woman. >> warner: john merrow has the story of a group of california charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supp
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6